top of page

Anthurium 'Black Haribon'

Accepted:

No

Established:

No

Nomenclatural Notes:

Published in:

Brillo, S. (2024b). Anthurium ‘Black Haribon’ A new name for an undescribed cultivar of A. brownii of unknown provenance. The IAS Newsletter, 46(2), 7–11. https://www.aroid.org/member/vault.php?file=newsletters/nl46-02.pdf

Released Year:

2020

Propagated:

Yes

Cultivar Type:

Hybrid

Originator:

N/A (Unknown Provenance)

Namer:

Samuel C. Brillo

Seed Parent:

Unknown

Pollen Parent:

Unknown

Base Species or Cultivar:

DFX_6488.JPG

Cultivar Origin:

Anthurium brownii belongs to section Belolonchium and is characterized by its thick leaves with typically wavy edges and prominent reticulate veins that become more noticeable when dry. The leaf exhibits a tendency to dry, resulting in a silver or grayish appearance on its two sides. The long and slender violet-purple spadix, as well as the red-orange berries, are also notable for their distinctiveness. This cultivar differs from the true A. brownii species having blades widely ovatetriangular, gradually acute at apex, acumen flat, apiculate tinged red-brown; inflorescence shorter than leaves, pale green at base of stipe, transitioning to mottled with red-violet at 1.5 cm, spathe green tinged red-violet at apex. Voucher’s inflorescence observed at pre-anthesis. Most measurements of vegetative structures are shorter. Interestingly, A. brownii is occasionally marketed as ‘Corong’, a name that most likely originates from the Indonesian market. It is unclear, though, if ‘Corong’ which is distinguished by leaf morphology resembling the true species is a cultivar. As of

Name Origin:

In honor of the “Haribon” mascot of the University of the City of Manila (Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila), where the author obtained his B.Sc. Biology degree and currently works as a full-time faculty member and chairperson of the Biology Department. Haribon (Pithecophaga jefferyi) is the Philippine National Bird’s local name. The term “Black” pertains to the dark green to black color of the leaves.

Growth Habit:

Terrestrial (in cultivation) to epiphyte; stems short, 10 cm diam.; roots few, thick, puberulent to densely velutinous, cataphylls (Figure 3b) coriaceous, 4-5 cm long, caudate-acuminate at apex, drying reddish-brown, persisting ± intact, eventually weathering to a network of fibers at the base.

Leaf Blade:

LEAVES erect to spreading; petioles 14-32 cm long, 0.48 cm diam., subterete, shallowly and bluntly sulcate; geniculum 1-1.5 cm long, sometimes tinged red-violet; blades widely ovate-triangular, moderately thick, 13.5 to 23 cm long, 12-20 cm wide, broadest at base, gradually acute at apex (the acumen flat, apiculate tinged red-brown), prominently lobed at base; anterior lobe 9-17.5 cm long, margins straight to convex; posterior lobes 5 to 8.5 cm long, directed sharply upward, the upper surface matte to semiglossy, lower surface paler; midrib convexly raised above, sunken at apex acutely raised below; basal veins 5-6 pairs, the first to fourth coalesced 1-4 cm, the posterior rib naked, upturned along outer margin; primary lateral veins 4-8 per side, departing midrib at 20°-35° angle, valley-like at base, sunken at apex, elevated below; smaller veins discernible but less pronounced; collective vein originating from lowest primary lateral vein or first basal vein, 1-5 mm from margin

Bloom and Fruit:

INFLORESCENCE erect, shorter than leaves; peduncle 25 cm long, 0.16 cm diam., terete, pale green at base of stipe transitioning to mottled with red-violet at 1.5 cm, shorter than petioles; spathe lanceolate, green tinged red-violet at apex, 4 cm long, 1.5 cm wide, acuminate at apex, round to cordate at base; spadix tapered, stipitate to ca 0.5 cm, violet-purple at base transitioning to pale green at apex 4.5 cm long, 0.32 cm diam.; flowers rhombic, flowers 0.1-0.2 cm long, 0.1-0.3 cm wide, the sides straight to sigmoid; 7-9 flowers visible in the principle spiral, 4-10 flowers in the alternate spiral. INFRUCTESCENCE not seen.

Distinguishing Characteristics:

Anthurium brownii belongs to section Belolonchium and is characterized by its thick leaves with typically wavy edges and prominent reticulate veins that become more noticeable when dry. The leaf exhibits a tendency to dry, resulting in a silver or grayish appearance on its two sides. The long and slender violet-purple spadix, as well as the red-orange berries, are also notable for their distinctiveness. This cultivar differs from the true A. brownii species having blades widely ovatetriangular, gradually acute at apex, acumen flat, apiculate tinged red-brown; inflorescence shorter than leaves, pale green at base of stipe, transitioning to mottled with red-violet at 1.5 cm, spathe green tinged red-violet at apex. Voucher’s inflorescence observed at pre-anthesis. Most measurements of vegetative structures are shorter. Interestingly, A. brownii is occasionally marketed as ‘Corong’, a name that most likely originates from the Indonesian market. It is unclear, though, if ‘Corong’ which is distinguished by leaf morphology resembling the true species is a cultivar. As of this writing, there is no ‘Arrow’, ‘Black Arrow’, ‘Corong’, or ‘Black Corong’ that is registered in Aroid Cultivar Registry. Also, not to be confused with ‘Black Beauty’ and ‘Black Love’, which might be also informal cultivars pertaining to A. andraeanum characterized by dark green leaves and dark maroon, glossy, heart-shaped spathe.

Addendum: This plant may also be attributed to Anthurium 'Bintang Kejora,' whose name originates from Indonesia. However, the name 'Bintang Kejora' is not registered in the Aroid Cultivar Registry, officially published, or formally known to science.

DFX_6488.JPG
DFX_6488.JPG
DFX_6488.JPG
DFX_6488.JPG
bottom of page